Eyes of a Hawk – Strong Mothers, Strong Sons

Eyes of a Hawk - Strong Mothers, Strong Sons

Before mothers can protect, or even become over-protective, they must employ each of their sensibilities in order to engage the protective action. Before they know how to keep their sons safe, each must identify the enemy. Something somewhere threatens his boyhood every day and because mothers are instinctively protective, they watch and listen for threats to their sons. When mothers respond to these threats—which today are often electronic—they attack.

In our sophisticated, electronics-saturated, post-modern culture, the threats to a boy’s health are insidious and terribly elusive. So good mothers keep their eyes wide open and their ears alert. Then their sons attack them for doing so. Usually this comes in the (manipulative) form of “you just don’t trust me.” But don’t be put off. Just as they don’t want to talk about their feelings but still want you to be interested in them, boys can’t say that they like restrictions; but they do, because that means their parents care. And deep down, it feels good to be watched. Again, like communicating their feelings, even though being watched feels good boys still reject it. This is another push and pull dynamic in a son’s relationship with his mother: do it, but don’t let me know you’re doing it.

Sadly, however, often when mothers hear their sons admonish them about a “trust” issue, they abdicate their better senses. Well, they reason, I guess you’re right. You’re a good kid. I should trust you. And their eyes turn away and their ears go deaf to make the young boy feel more grown-up. Big mistake.

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A Terrifying Beauty – Strong Mothers, Strong Sons

A Terrifying Beauty - Strong Mothers, Strong Sons


In the early evening of a hot summer day I sat at the end of a wooden dock, my feet skimming the tepid water, watching a mother swan. Her coat was so white it shone vaguely blue, particularly as she floated atop the turquoise lake water.

 

What struck me most, however, was not her spectacular beauty but her calm demeanor. She floated, almost rested, on top of the water. Her head shifted from left to right above her long, graceful neck. Her movements were calculated and secure.

Behind her floated three cygnets, looking like puffy cotton balls with beaks. I recognized them as her offspring, not simply by their coal beaks but by her commanding demeanor. She was silent. They squeaked. And when they spoke to her she neither stopped or acknowledged their presence. She just kept paddling along. Neither mother nor cygnets seemed to pay any attention to each other. Always she kept her paddle feet pulling back the water beneath her breast.

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Book Release – Strong Mothers – Strong Sons

Book Release - Strong Mothers - Strong Sons

Dr. Meg’s NEW RELEASE!

From the moment a mother holds her newborn son, his eyes tell her that she is his world. But often, as he grows up, the boy who needs her simultaneously pushes her away. Calling upon thirty years of experience as a pediatrician, Meg Meeker, M.D., a highly sought after national speaker, assistant professor of clinical medicine, and mother of four, shares the secrets that every mother needs to know in order to strengthen—or rebuild—her relationship with her son.

Boys today face unique challenges and pressures, and the burden on mothers to guide their boys through them can feel overwhelming. This empowering book offers a road map to help mothers find the strength and confidence to raise extraordinary sons by providing encouragement, education, and practical advice about:

• the need for mothers to exercise courage and be bolder and more confident about advising and directing their boys
• the crucial role mothers play in expressing love to sons in healthy ways so they learn to respect and appreciate women as they grow up
• the importance of teaching sons about the values of hard work, community service, and a well-developed inner life
• the natural traps mothers of boys often fall into—and how to avoid them
• the need for a mother to heal her own wounds with the men in her life so she can raise her son without baggage and limitations
• the best ways to survive the moments when the going gets tough and a mom’s natural ways of communicating—talking, analyzing, exploring—only fuel the fire

When a mother holds her baby boy for the first time, she also instinctively knows something else: If she does her job right and raises her son with self-esteem, support, and wisdom, he will become the man she knows he was meant to be.

Now Available through:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

iBooks

Indiebound

Dating Not Required

Dating Not Required

 

By Dr. Meg Meeker

Dear Dr. Meg,

We have a 24 year old daughter who is very smart, but cannot seem to pick a decent guy to date. She is very giving, caring and also a people pleaser and does not like conflict. Can you recommend a book to us to share with her?

Thank you

Dr. Meg’s Response

Dear Mom:

I like the book I Kissed Dating Goodbye by Josh Harris.

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Prestigious Award Given for New Autism treatment

Prestigious Award Given for New Autism treatment

New hope may be available for children with autism. A study published in
the reputable journal Behavioral Neuroscience found that autistic behavior
in children ages 3-12 years old who received environmental sensory
experiences found marked improvement in their behavior.
The researchers from the University of California at Irvine won the D.G.
Marquis Behavioral Neuroscience Award for their work using the
Mendability Sensory Enrichment program. The program uses sensory
experiences such as having children place their hands on bowls
of varying degrees of warm water or walking on surfaces with different
textures. The program used no medication.

The Mendability Sensory Enrichment program was
co-founded by Eyal Aranoff, whose own daughter was diagnosed
with autism. With this sensory training, she is now reportedly
able to function as a normal teenager. The program follows carefully
selected sensory activities that can be done at home and it is designed
to be used along with other autism treatments.
This program is well worth checking out.

Visit www.mendability.com for more information.