Dad Says Good-Bye for a While

Dad Says Good-Bye for a While

So you think you know the NFL? Think again. There are great dads in the league but you won’ t hear about them because they don’t leave scandals that titillate reporters looking for juicy stories to boost their careers. My buddy Benjamin Watson (below) sent me this photo as he was leaving for training to start the new season. He left his beautiful babies through tears and anguish, worrying what cost their dad’s separation might have for them.

Read the full post

Dr. Meg’s Interview on the Steven Spierer Show

Dr. Meg's Interview on the Steven Spierer Show

Get Download Now

[ Right Clink on the Link & Hit "Save" ]

Good Men = Great Families

Good Men = Great Families

Dr. Meg – from the NFL’s Fatherhood Initiative:

We don’t often (ever?) associate the NFL with parenting.  As a pediatrician, I get it. These gifted athletes come to the NFL to play well, help get their team to the Super Bowl, draw large crowds and well, make money for the organization. That’s all good, but I know that there’s more to these men than meets the eye, and my job as their advocate, is to help each one who is willing, to build upon and show off his skills as a father.

Don’t underestimate the importance of this task because we, who work with the NFL, have an important charge. Millions are watching the players and their families and I want these folks to see what’s right with their families, not the mistakes that they are making. And I do believe that we’re off to a great start.

Read the full post

Keeping Your Son On The Right Track In a World Filled With Ugliness

Keeping Your Son On The Right Track In a World Filled With Ugliness

All conscientious parents of sons ask themselves at some point, “What can we do to keep our sweet boy from going down a dark path?” Some of us are haunted by painful events in our community reminding us that kids get murdered, become murderers, get kidnapped, and become addicted to meth in our own neighborhoods. The world is a terrifying place for parents.

But here is the good news: we can have hope for each of our sons. After 25 years of seeing a lot of troubling things, I believe that with all of my heart.

First of all, many healthy kids go through trials during their teen years and some may dabble with alcohol, drugs, and sex. But most who are raised in a sound family pull through and end up on the right track when they are in their twenties.

A Perfect Storm Is Brewing

Let’s focus, though, on the boys who murder, shoot people, and want to blow up buildings. These kids are deeply, deeply troubled, and most adults who work with kids can predict that they are headed for trouble.

Read the full post

Loving My Son without Enabling Him

Loving My Son without Enabling Him

Question: How does one DO love without enabling them or ignoring them? I’ve not been able to get to a middle road with knowing how and when and what it looks like.

I tell our son I love him. I’ve explained to him why I do the things I do for him (wash laundry, buy certain food, share a movie) but unless I’m doing and accepting what he wants (horrific movies or music, language, smoking) I am not “loving” him he thinks.

When he gets out of jail how do I go about this love thing and how does it work? I’ve always been lost here. I pray for him and I tell him I do. I quote scriptures. I tell him stories about myself or my dad or when he was little. I’m trying but don’t think it’s enough. Also being 20 years old how do boundries really work? Books don’t seem to go far enough for me to quite nail it down.

Thanks, I realize you probably are very busy, but if you could point me to something that has some “bottomline” info.

Read the full post